Nov 4, 2010
Nov 4, 2010
Nov 4, 2010
Nov 4, 2010
Nov 4, 2010
Nov 4, 2010

Jar

Jar

c. 1895

attributed to Nampeyo of Hano

(Hopi-Tewa, c. 1860–1942)

Ceramic, slip

Overall: 16.8 x 29.2 cm (6 5/8 x 11 1/2 in.)

John L. Severance Fund 1986.241

Did you know?

Nampeyo helped to revive fine Hopi pottery-making in the late 1800s.

Description

Nampeyo is famous in the history of Southwest pottery. Starting in the 1870s, her gifts as a potter, designer, and painter made her critical in reviving Hopi ceramics after a long decline caused in part by the devastating toll of European diseases on Indigenous communities. Early in her career, she used nearby ancient sites as archives, consulting their plentiful ceramics for the shapes and designs her ancestors favored. Her study of the past is apparent in this jar; its motifs and difficult-to-create shape are inspired by those used at the ancient Awat’ovi and Sikyatki villages, respectively.

See also
Department: 
Art of the Americas
Type of artwork: 
Ceramic
Medium: 
Ceramic, slip

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